ART

Weekend Cheat Sheet: April 2 - 8, 2018

Rarely seen works from Donald Judd, a new collection from architect and artist Tron Meyer, and more cultural intel to help you make the most of your weekend plans.

Rarely seen works from Donald Judd, a new collection from architect and artist Tron Meyer, and more cultural intel to help you make the most of your weekend plans.

A short list of the can’t-miss new exhibition openings (and closings) this week, by city. See last week’s list for other recent openings, and for a more comprehensive guide, see our Itinerary.

 

NEW YORK

The Photography Show 2018
Pier 94
OPENS: April 5
Presented by the Association of International Photography Art Dealers, this long-running photography fair heads into its 38th edition with an array of more than 100 leading galleries presenting artworks from the 19th century to today. Rounding out the program are special exhibitions—“A Time for Reflection,” curated by Elton John; works selected from the collection of Joe Baio—and panel discussions with leading practitioners in the industry.
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Tron Meyer “Mars”
Patrick Parrish
OPENS: April 5
For the Norwegian artist and architect’s first solo exhibition in the United States, Patrick Parrish gallery presents a new collection of furniture, sculpture, and paintings that draws on the shared capacity of architecture, design, and art to both communicate and contain narratives.

“Jonas Wood Prints”
Gagosian (976 Madison Avenue)
OPENS: April 5
The gallery presents the first survey of the artist’s printmaking practice with a showcase of fifty-plus limited-edition prints. The works, made between 2004 and 2018 and rendered with vivid detail, take on a wide range of motifs—museum interiors, tennis courts, logos—that fit the chaos of everyday life into cohesive wholes.

Stan Douglas “DCTs and Scenes from the Blackout”
David Zwirner (525 West 19th Street)
CLOSES: April 7
In two contrasting series, DCT (2016–ongoing) and Blackout (2017), on view through Saturday, the photographer and filmmaker continues his investigations into the nature of image making and its relationship to reality. The former—an abstract collection of images created by inputting a series of numbers corresponding to frequencies, amplitudes, and color values into a custom-designed program—plays with the role technology plays in photographic representation; the latter, staged scenes from a imaginary emergency situation of power loss in New York City, explores what happens to human emotions in such scenarios.

“Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect”
The Bronx Museum of the Arts
CLOSES: April 8
The artist bore holes into New York’s derelict buildings in the ’70s as much as a political critique on socioeconomic stratification as a representation of his deep engagement with the city’s urban landscape. Here, more than 100 of his works chronicle his practice, and the role of the Bronx in his art and activism.
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Wayne Sorce, "Dave’s Restaurant, New York," 1984. Courtesy of Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

ELSEWHERE

“Modigliani”
Tate Modern
London
CLOSES: April 2
The highlight of this comprehensive retrospective of the Italian expressionist are his provocative, sensuous sculptures, including 12 iconic nudes, and portraits of his friends and peers such as Pablo Picasso and Constantin Brancusi.
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Pascale Marthine Tayou “Beautiful”
The Bass
Miami
CLOSES: April 2
This exhibition of the artist’s sculptures and installations presents a new, site-specific work, “Welcome Wall,” an LED sign that communicates in more than 70 languages and underscores the Cameroonian artist’s inclusive, transcultural practice.
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(Opening image: Pascale Marthine Tayou, “Masque Délavé” (2015). Photo: Rémi Lavalle. Courtesy of the artist and Galleria Continua) 

“Donald Judd: Paintings”
Institute of Contemporary Art
Miami
OPENS: April 5
The fourteen rarely seen works on view here, all created between 1959 and 1961, shed light on a crucial point in the artist’s experimentation with form and color, effectively presaging the three-dimensional works for which he is best known.

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