THE LIST

6 Must-See Exhibitions to Take in This Fall

Make time for contemplation and inspiration this season by exploring these evocative shows hosted by galleries across the U.S.

The current art offerings on view transform—somewhat poetically—in tandem with the change in seasons, lending themselves to a fresh crop of exhibitions and, consequently, new sensory experiences. From vibrant French fashion illustration to a provocative political retrospective, these exhibitions feature works from artists of international éclat and capture their respective galleries’ distinct missions.

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1. Johns, de Kooning, and Twombly at Susan Sheehan Gallery 
This Gramercy Park gallery captures the cultural spirit of postwar American by celebrating compelling works on paper. This pattern-driven collection combines ’60s-era prints from Jasper Johns, Willem de Kooning, and Cy Twombly.
Susan Sheehan Gallery, 136 East 16th Street, New York, ongoing; by appointment only.

Jasper Johns, “False Start II,” 1962; “False Start I,” 1962; “Coat Hanger,” 1960; “Ale Cans,” 1964; “Flag I,” 1960. Willem de Kooning, “Litho #1 (Waves #1),” 1960. Cy Twombly, “Note II,” 1967.

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2. “Early Entropy Paintings,” Matt McCormick at Tappan
This startup connects art appreciators to exceptional emerging talent via its online marketplace and IRL pop-ups. “Early Entropy Paintings” from L.A.-based artist Matt McCormick juxtaposes mundane objects with the abstract emotions connected to them, evoking both the artist’s penchant for nostalgia and his fascination with the American West.
Tappan, 1525 South Broadway, Fl. 4, Los Angeles, on view through Sept. 28.

Matt McCormick, “Untitled I,” 2017; “Untitled II,” 2017.

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3. “Dialogue Series,” Lee Ufan at Pace Gallery
Pace is unveiling its first-ever focused exhibition of color paintings from Lee Ufan’s ongoing “Dialogue Series.” These mineral-pigment paintings (which take up to a month to complete) are among the artist’s largest works, spanning up to 25 feet long. Ufan’s works are arranged to encourage viewers’ interaction and contemplation within the space.
Pace Gallery, 510 West 25th Street, New York, on view Sept. 14–Oct. 13.

Lee Ufan, “Dialogue No. 69096," 2017-18.

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4. “Unapologetic Lines,” Marc-Antoine Coulon at SCAD FASH
SCAD is a university that highlights contemporary artists generating cultural dialogue, both with local and international scope. The upcoming “Unapologetic Lines” show at the SCAD Fashion + Film Museum in Atlanta, features the work of Marc-Antoine Coulon, a Parisian fashion illustrator whose elegant yet irreverent portraits capture the distinct verve and passion of fashion icons in simplified strokes and studied curves.
SCAD FASH Museum of Fashion + Film, 1600 Peachtree St. NW, Atlanta, on view Sept. 14–Jan. 27.

Marc-Antoine Coulon, “Versace,” 2014; “Commes des Garçons: Vogue,” 2017.

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5. “Concepts and Intuitions 1965–2016,” Adrian Piper at Hammer Museum
This L.A. institution is on a mission to spark culturally transformative conversations. This fall, it will unveil the most comprehensive West Coast retrospective of artist Adrian Piper’s work yet, featuring more than 270 provocative multi-media pieces that span her 50-year career.
Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, on view Oct. 7–Jan. 6.

Adrian Piper, “Safe #1,” 1990.

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6. Gottlieb, Mitchell, and Rauschenberg at Edward Tyler Nahem Fine Art
Founded in New York in 1985, this gallery is renowned for exhibiting exceptional modern, postwar, and contemporary art. Among the works currently on display are paintings from Adolf Gottlieb, Joan Mitchell, and Robert Rauschenberg, all of whose bold, colorful canvases tell thematic stories.
Edward Nahem Gallery, 37 W 57th St # 200, New York, on view through Oct. 4.

 

 

Adolf Gottlieb, “Pink and Blue,” 1971; Joan Mitchell, “Un,” 1992.

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