J. Hill’s Standard

J. Hill’s Standard

Based in Ireland, J. HILL’s Standard creates crystal pieces that are usable, accessible, and innovative. We incorporate traditional glass making techniques while also building upon them, exploring new making challenges and collaborations with other glass houses.    
J. Hill's Standard's master craftsmen blend the traditional techniques of hand-cutting and mouth-blowing glass with the modern sensibilities of international designers such as Martino Gamper and Scholten & Baijings. The result: timeless pieces with true staying power.

Cuttings Whiskey Tumbler by Martino Gamper for J. HILL's Standard

This award-winning glass is one of six different cuts. The series has been retained by the Louvre for its permanent collection at the Museé des Arts Decoratifs.

View More

Elements Tall Glasses by Scholten & Baijings for J. HILL's Standard

Scholten & Baijings created an extensive range of cuts and built these up on individual glasses and across a range of glass types. The Dutch design duo is known for their work with 'palettes,' typically of color and material. Now they have used this approach to develop a palette of ‘cuts’ to be applied to crystal. Each glass in the Elements series has a different design, so that you can create collections of glasses that are matching or nonmatching, restrained or exuberant.

View More

Secant Desk Light by Daniel Rybakken for J. HILL's Standard

Utilizing the refractive qualities and geometric simplicity of crystal glass discs as a point of departure Daniel has designed three lights: wall, floor, and table. Restrained and minimal, this modular design allows the glass to be appreciated without any overbearing interventions. Daniel says of the piece: "Secant is about visual and semiotic contrast; the glass discs communicate something pure, fragile and elevated in value, while the machined metal parts communicate the industrial."

View More

Based in Ireland, J. HILL’s Standard creates crystal pieces that are usable, accessible, and innovative. We incorporate traditional glass making techniques while also building upon them, exploring new making challenges and collaborations with other glass houses.